His had the immovable

Editors note: Mick Ebeling is the founder of Not Impossible Labs and The Ebeling Group. He is an international speaker on the subject of open source medical devices and a USA Network Top 10 Cultural Trailblazer.
(CNN) — Its a good thing I didnt know exactly how dangerous a trip I was embarking on, because when I left home in October 2013 to fly to Sudan, I was scared enough. What I had committed to was, quite frankly, the most impossible thing Id ever tried to accomplish.
Three months earlier, over dinner, Id learned about a doctor in Sudans Nuba mountains, Dr. Tom Catena, who was treating thousands of people — many of them children — whod had limbs blown off in the Sudanese governments bombing raids. By coincidence, wed just posted an article to our website about Richard Van As, an amazing inventor who created a low-cost, 3-D printed prosthetic hand. So, over a second beer, I raised the possibility — wouldnt it be cool if we brought printers over to Sudan and made arms for these kids?

Mick Ebeling

The story might have ended there — one of those plans you cook up over dinner and forget by breakfast. Really, what can one person do in the face of such widespread sorrow thousands of miles away?
But when I got home and looked up Dr. Catena, I read about one of the patients hed treated: Daniel — a 12-year-old boy who, in attempting to protect himself from an aerial attack, wrapped his arms around a tree. The tree protected his body, but both his arms were blown off by the bomb that exploded those few meters away.

The amputation and hospital treatment had saved his life, but when Daniel woke and realized what had happened he said he wished he would have died. It was one of the most heart-wrenching stories Id ever read.

What if it were my kid? What if this happened to them and somebody out there could help them — and didnt?
Mick Ebeling, Not Impossible Labs

It was 11pm. I looked down the hallway to where my three boys were sleeping and thought, What if it were my kid? What if this happened to them and somebody out there could help them — and didnt?
In that moment, I realized I couldnt just close the computer, get a glass of water and go to bed. I had to do something.
Going to Sudan try to help thousands of people was way too daunting. There was no way I could get my head around that.
I couldnt help the many. But I could help one.
I could help Daniel.
Crash course in 3-D printing
Mind you, at the time I knew very little about 3-D printing, and even less about prosthetic arms. So I did what I always do: surround myself with smart people, shut up, and absorb their brilliance. I brought together all the experts — including the great Van As himself — to give me a crash course in 3-D printing and prosthetic arms.

Sudan: Crisis in Kordofan

3-D printer helps boy get hand

Meet the genius behind 3-D printing

Step 1: 3-D print the files.
Step 2: Soften orthoplastic in hot water, then wrap it around the patients limb to mold the custom-fitted, medical-grade, breathable plastic that will anchor the printed components.
Step 3: Attach the hand and the gauntlet, and thread the cabling through each digit, running it back to an attachment point behind the patients wrist or elbow. The motion of the wrist (up and down) or elbow (side to side) then pulls on the cabling and draws the fingers to a close. In short, the cables tense and release around a pivot point.
The crash course done, and just three short months after that initial dinner, I found myself in Yida — a desolate, dusty refugee camp in South Sudan — a home to 70,000 hungry and desperate people, driven from their homes by bombing campaigns and unimaginable horrors.
I set up shop in an old toolshed and got ready to make a working mechanical arm. Despite the heat (which kept melting the printing filament) and the bugs (which kept jamming up the 3-D printer motors), I managed to get the 3-D printers working and set about making an arm … for a real boy, now sitting five feet away from me. That boy Id read about that night in my kitchen back in July. Daniel.
Meeting Daniel
Daniel was non-communicative when we first met. He stared, sullen and resigned, off into the middle distance. I gave him my tablet to play with while I worked, and he did what any other teenager would do: found a video game and started playing. Only he used his stumps instead of his fingers. Little by little, he began to trust me and started to show some interest in what I was doing. Every time I got frustrated, or something wasnt working right, I just had to look over at Daniel and nothing else mattered. I had to make it work.
After a few days, and a few failures, we managed to fit an arm on Daniel. He wasnt yet strong enough to make the motion that would make the hand clench — that would come later — but he could manipulate the hand to his mouth. I fitted it with a tin spoon and took him to the mess tent. We sat him in front of a bowl of goat and pumpkin stew.
It was here, for the first time in two years, that Daniel fed himself. He looked over at me and, slowly, a little smirk curled his lips. He turned back, looked at the small crowd that had gathered around him, broke into the biggest grin youd ever seen, then went back in for more.

By helping one, you have the potential to help many.
Mick Ebeling, Not Impossible Labs

I knew then, that I had stumbled upon something way bigger than myself, bigger than Daniel, and bigger than that one meal. It was the idea that by helping one, you have the potential to help many — and that might just be the secret to it all.
The reality, I believe, is that all change starts small. The big picture is just too unwieldy, too incomprehensible and seemingly immovable. But give us something individual, quantifiable and personalize-able and, suddenly, our perspective shifts to the one.
Just one step. Just one mile. Just one dollar. Just one kiss. Just one person. When we look at life through the lens of one, everything becomes that much more attainable.
By the end of the week, I was in Sudans Nuba Mountains where Dr. Catenas hospital continues his work. With a steady stream of solar power, I gathered a roomful of locals — some invited, some not — and taught them how to 3-D print. Most of them had never seen a computer before, and none of them had ever seen a 3-D printer. Yet, there we were, getting ready to start a hand-making factory, excited about the possibility of making arms for other amputees.
As I was packing up to leave, we all talked about what we wanted to accomplish. We talked about how many limbs we wanted to make, how many people we wanted to help, how many arms we wanted to have done by the time I return.
And I stopped myself.
It doesnt matter how many we make, I told them. Well get there, eventually.
For now, just make one.
Find out more about Project Daniel



Read: 3-D printed hearts: The shape of medicine to come
Interactive: How 3-D printing will reshape the world
Read: The night I invented 3-D printing

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Mick Ebeling.

Find second congress he life

(CNN) — Imagine a warm brew of lager so heady you had to plunge a straw through the thick surface scum to get to the fermented liquor below.
Welcome to the favored brew of ancient Egypts New Kingdom; a 3,200-year-old barley beer that a new archaeological find this month is shedding new light on.
A Japanese team headed by Jiro Kondo of Waseda University stumbled on the tomb of ancient beer-maker Khonso Em Heb while cleaning the courtyard of another tomb at the Thebes necropolis in the Egyptian city of Luxor.
The tomb, replete with highly colored frescoes, is being hailed as one of the most significant finds of recent times.
Egypts antiquities minister Mohamed Ibrahim described Khonso Em Heb as the chief maker of beer for gods of the dead adding that the tombs chambers contain fabulous designs and colors, reflecting details of daily life… along with their religious rituals.
One fresco shows Khonso Em Heb — who apart from being a brewer, headed the royal storehouses during the pharaonic Ramesside period (1,292–1,069 BC) — making offerings to the gods along with his wife and daughter.
The newly discovered tomb is to be placed under tight security until the excavation work is completed, the ministry said in a press statement.
Read more: How not to do a desert adventure
The frescoes depict daily life and religious rituals.
According to Professor Poo Mun Chou, a leading Egyptologist at Hong Kongs Chinese University, the discovery is not only significant in terms of what it tells archaeologists about life during the New Kingdom period of Ancient Egypt, but marks a new direction for Egypts beleaguered antiquities ministry.
Still reeling from a disastrous break-in at the Cairo Museum in 2011 — when looters smashed two mummies and made off with more than 50 artifacts — Egypts Supreme Council of Antiquities had slapped stringent restrictions on archaeological digs.
For Professor Poo, the latest discovery is a sign that archeology in Egypt may be returning to normal.
The significance in this find is that for quite some time archaeologists havent been able to excavate an intact tomb, he said.
This is a new find and is quite unexpected.
Poo Man Chou, Egyptologist
An intact tomb will give us a more complete view of the funerary customs which can be compared with other tomb paintings.
He said the frescoes were well preserved.
The Supreme Council of Antiquities has for some time had a policy of not excavating new tombs but preserving those tombs that have already been excavated.
This is a new find and is quite unexpected.
Apart from the recent political turmoil in Egypt, which has led to a surge in the number of illegal digs and antiquities damaged by looters, Professor Poo said the sheer speed with which new discoveries were being made had meant the government was having difficulty keeping up with logging and preserving the finds.
Read more: Razing the dead in Bahrain
Excavation around Thebes could be returning to normal.
Add to this the problem of protecting ancient tombs, which begin to degrade the moment they are opened, and Egypts antiquities authorities have their work cut out for them.
In Egypt, of course, the dry weather means the danger of this is less, but still after some time the color of the painting begins to fade away.
That is why Egypt now has a stricter policy.
While foreign archaeological teams are still operating in Egypt, the political climate has made it more difficult for them to do their work.
Even the International Association of Egyptologists (IAE) was told late last year that Egypt — because of the political situation — was unable to host the 2014 International Congress of Egyptologists.
The IAE is currently seeking bids for a second country to host the prestigious congress.
Meanwhile, historians and archaeologists are making use of the latest find while it is still available to be studied.
Alcohol in ancient Egypt was very important — not just in terms of daily consumption but also as an offering to deities. Beer, in particular was very important, said Poo.
Beer during the New Kingdom period was probably one-fifth or even one-tenth the price of wine making it a very popular drink for people of all social strata.
Read more: Graffiti transforms Cairos streets
While the appeal of beer across all social classes remains to this day, Professor Poo says the modern drinker might struggle to recognize the barley or millet-based beverage of ancient times.
While its a close cousin to modern beer, its manufacture was more primitive and they had to use a tube to extract the liquid from below which would have had a fermented layer of substance floating on the top of the jar, he said.
It would have had bubbles, he added.

Reflecting ınternational transforms studied

(CNN) — Imagine a warm brew of lager so heady you had to plunge a straw through the thick surface scum to get to the fermented liquor below.
Welcome to the favored brew of ancient Egypts New Kingdom; a 3,200-year-old barley beer that a new archaeological find this month is shedding new light on.
A Japanese team headed by Jiro Kondo of Waseda University stumbled on the tomb of ancient beer-maker Khonso Em Heb while cleaning the courtyard of another tomb at the Thebes necropolis in the Egyptian city of Luxor.
The tomb, replete with highly colored frescoes, is being hailed as one of the most significant finds of recent times.
Egypts antiquities minister Mohamed Ibrahim described Khonso Em Heb as the chief maker of beer for gods of the dead adding that the tombs chambers contain fabulous designs and colors, reflecting details of daily life… along with their religious rituals.
One fresco shows Khonso Em Heb — who apart from being a brewer, headed the royal storehouses during the pharaonic Ramesside period (1,292–1,069 BC) — making offerings to the gods along with his wife and daughter.
The newly discovered tomb is to be placed under tight security until the excavation work is completed, the ministry said in a press statement.
Read more: How not to do a desert adventure
The frescoes depict daily life and religious rituals.
According to Professor Poo Mun Chou, a leading Egyptologist at Hong Kongs Chinese University, the discovery is not only significant in terms of what it tells archaeologists about life during the New Kingdom period of Ancient Egypt, but marks a new direction for Egypts beleaguered antiquities ministry.
Still reeling from a disastrous break-in at the Cairo Museum in 2011 — when looters smashed two mummies and made off with more than 50 artifacts — Egypts Supreme Council of Antiquities had slapped stringent restrictions on archaeological digs.
For Professor Poo, the latest discovery is a sign that archeology in Egypt may be returning to normal.
The significance in this find is that for quite some time archaeologists havent been able to excavate an intact tomb, he said.
This is a new find and is quite unexpected.
Poo Man Chou, Egyptologist
An intact tomb will give us a more complete view of the funerary customs which can be compared with other tomb paintings.
He said the frescoes were well preserved.
The Supreme Council of Antiquities has for some time had a policy of not excavating new tombs but preserving those tombs that have already been excavated.
This is a new find and is quite unexpected.
Apart from the recent political turmoil in Egypt, which has led to a surge in the number of illegal digs and antiquities damaged by looters, Professor Poo said the sheer speed with which new discoveries were being made had meant the government was having difficulty keeping up with logging and preserving the finds.
Read more: Razing the dead in Bahrain
Excavation around Thebes could be returning to normal.
Add to this the problem of protecting ancient tombs, which begin to degrade the moment they are opened, and Egypts antiquities authorities have their work cut out for them.
In Egypt, of course, the dry weather means the danger of this is less, but still after some time the color of the painting begins to fade away.
That is why Egypt now has a stricter policy.
While foreign archaeological teams are still operating in Egypt, the political climate has made it more difficult for them to do their work.
Even the International Association of Egyptologists (IAE) was told late last year that Egypt — because of the political situation — was unable to host the 2014 International Congress of Egyptologists.
The IAE is currently seeking bids for a second country to host the prestigious congress.
Meanwhile, historians and archaeologists are making use of the latest find while it is still available to be studied.
Alcohol in ancient Egypt was very important — not just in terms of daily consumption but also as an offering to deities. Beer, in particular was very important, said Poo.
Beer during the New Kingdom period was probably one-fifth or even one-tenth the price of wine making it a very popular drink for people of all social strata.
Read more: Graffiti transforms Cairos streets
While the appeal of beer across all social classes remains to this day, Professor Poo says the modern drinker might struggle to recognize the barley or millet-based beverage of ancient times.
While its a close cousin to modern beer, its manufacture was more primitive and they had to use a tube to extract the liquid from below which would have had a fermented layer of substance floating on the top of the jar, he said.
It would have had bubbles, he added.

Goal support mentor job

Editors note: Leading Women connects you to extraordinary women of our time. Each month, we meet two women at the top of their field, exploring their careers, lives and ideas.
(CNN) — Is Gail Kelly the most powerful woman in Australian business? Shes got to be up there.
This is the chief executive of the countrys second largest bank — Westpac — overseeing a whopping US$613 billion in assets and over 36,000 employees.
Its quite a portfolio, and all the more impressive considering the 57-year-old mother-of-four started out as a bank teller a little over 30 years ago.
Born in South Africa to British parents, Kelly originally taught Latin at high schools, before working at Nedcor Bank in Johannesburg — becoming head of human resources just five months after giving birth to triplets.

Westpac CEO Gail Kelly wants 50% women in management positions by 2017.Getty Images

The family moved to Sydney and in 2002 Kelly became the first female CEO of a major Australian bank — the Commonwealth Bank.
Today she is the 62nd most powerful woman in the world, according to Forbes, but admits the notoriously male-dominated banking world has been a tough area to crack.
Now the boss at Westpac, Kelly made it her mission to have 40% women in senior management positions by 2014 — a target she smashed in 2012.
How has she achieved her phenomenal success and what is her vision for the future of Australias oldest bank? CNNs Leading Women sat down with the financial trailblazer to find out.
I grew up in a very strong, nuclear family. My father was a sportsman. He represented South Africa in a couple of sports, so he was a very positive person and someone who encouraged you to be your best and give your best with everything that you do. And so I grew up in this environment that was nurturing, supporting, but certainly encouraging.
42% of our management team are women. So weve reset the goal to 50% by 2017. Because thats when Westpac becomes 200 years old as an institution — the oldest bank, and indeed the oldest company in Australia. So thats a lovely point to reflect on.
When I got to be a CEO I said: Right. Im now going to tackle gender inequality head-on. Im going to make a difference, and lead by example, and actively put in place policies and practices to support women.

I was in a forum yesterday where there would have been 60 leaders of banks and insurance companies and I was literally the only woman.
Gail Kelly, CEO Westpac

The banking world is a particularly tough area to crack for women. I was in a forum yesterday where there would have been 60 leaders of banks and insurance companies and I was literally the only woman.
My husband being a paediatrician was awesome. With four children — three of them triplets — I needed a lot of help and support at home. He did more than his fair share of everything in the home and I could not have done what Ive done without that.
Nelson Mandela was an outstanding leader and a mentor for me. I was in South Africa at the time he was released. I was in South Africa when he was inaugurated as the first president. And he – after the 27 years of imprisonment, a lot of it in solitary confinement – truly understood that his vision, his purpose, was to transform South Africa, a reconciled South Africa.
My advice would be: dig deep. Gather all your courage in your hands. Youve been offered this opportunity because you are worthy. You dont have to be 100% ready for this job. You dont have to be 80% ready for this job. You do need support around you and you do need a determination and a preparedness to work hard. But back yourself.
Read: Death of the banking boys club? Female trailblazers to watch
Debate: Is Aussie politics too blokey?
Learn: Five things you didnt know about Janet Yellen

Williams recaps world his

(CNN) — Yet another reason for fans of The Voice to get Happy.
NBC tweeted confirmation on Monday that Pharrell Williams will be joining the show as a coach for Season 7 of the reality singing competition.
Okay, we can OFFICIALLY say it! WE ARE SO #HAPPY to announce PHARRELL WILLIAMS = #NewVoiceCoach for SEASON 7, the tweet read.
Okay, we can OFFICIALLY say it! WE ARE SO #HAPPY to announce PHARRELL WILLIAMS = #NewVoiceCoach for SEASON 7. pic.twitter.com/GayqbMeU1l— The Voice (@NBCTheVoice) March 31, 2014
Thats music to the ears of many fans who have been clamoring for Williams to be involved with the show. In 2013, one of the shows coaches, Usher, brought Williams in as a guest mentor for his team and the Happy singer brought it. So much so that it prompted the New York Magazines Vulture column to headline one of their recaps Pharrell should be a coach.
Its been a huge year for Pharrell, with recognition for his contribution in the world of music — the Despicable Me franchise soundtracks, his Oscar-nominated song Happy and his Grammy-winning collaboration with Daft Punk on the breakout dance hit Get Lucky. His dominance in record sales in 2014, coupled with his incomparable accomplishments in the world of fashion and design, make him an irresistible addition to The Voice family, said Paul Telegdy of NBC Entertainment.
He has already made a considerable impact as a mentor, drawing on an impressive track record as both a producer and performer. It is a perfect fit for The Voice as we evolve and reach for new heights with this franchise. It feels like we are welcoming an existing family member home.
On Monday Williams retweeted the NBC tweet adding: This is going to be so fun.

İsnt sanchez a the elements

(CNN) — Its like a stunt from the latest James Bond movie, only this isnt a movie.
Adorned in a designer suit and sunglasses, a sailor sprints up the 30-meter mast of a boat as it plows ahead at a 60-degree angle.
Hopping over ropes and rigging it takes him just 16 seconds to reach the masts peak. There, he checks himself, removes his sunglasses, pops them in his top pocket and dives into the ocean nine meters below him.
Its the most stupid thing Ive ever done, is Alex Thomsons frank assessment of his stunt.
It wasnt safe at all, adds the yachtsman more used to solo circumnavigating the globe. Only looking back do I really appreciate how dangerous it actually was.

The changing face of Americas Cup

103-year-old beautys film debut

103-year-old beautys film debut

Who are the best sailors of 2013?

The stunt was carried out without a harness, just a water resistant suit, although the risk was reduced thanks to the work of a stunt co-ordinator and two days of preparation on the water.
For Thomsons daredevil performance to succeed he also needed a wind speed of exactly 18 to 20 knots and for the boat to be traveling at 10 knots (a little under 20 kph).
The 37-year-old and his team began their search for the perfect wind speed in Palma, Mallorca, but were forced to switch to Tarifa in southern Spain because conditions werent right before eventually shifting to Cadiz where the stunt was eventually performed.
At the end of the first day, I had to sit down on shore and calm down, says Thomson.
I was appreciating perhaps it wasnt safe at all, and there were some hairy moments when we were practicing. I remember one time I was halfway up when the boat suddenly tacked and I was just left hanging from the mast.
Obviously falling from that height from the mast onto the deck isnt advisable, he quips. The ramifications wouldnt have been great.
On the day itself, with stunning skies above, the stunt went pretty much perfectly, which had a lot to do with the man driving the boat, Ross Daniel.
His was the harder, more nerve wracking job as he had to keep the boat just right, says Thomson. Ross works for me and hes a good mate so obviously he was conscious he didnt want things to go wrong.
Im not sure if he was relieved come the end of it but he was certainly happy man with how it went.
As for Thomsons starring role in the escapade, hes conscious that he came very close to really hurting himself.
Now the top of a mast isnt really designed for a man to dive off but I went for it and it held up, says the yachtsman.
As for the dive itself, I slightly over-egged. There was some quite impressive editing work on that as I landed head first very close to my back.

Greatest Americas Cup finale ever?

French skipper Thomas Coville is the latest yachtsman trying to tackle the round-the-world solo record in his trimaran Sodebo.

In February 2009, Michel Desjoyeaux became the first — and still only — man to twice win the Vendee Globe, considered by many the pinnacle of ocean racing.

The worlds leading yachtsmen marvel at the often glorious skyline on their various solo voyages — here the sun sets on British skipper Alex Thomson.

Sailors are left to spend months at sea on their own with only satellite phones and the occasional helicopter flying overhead to keep them company.

The end of each voyage is traditionally met by huge fanfare with tens of thousands of spectators. Here Francis Joyon celebrates his record of 57 days for circumnavigating the globe.

Britains Robin Knox-Johnston was the first man to perform a singlehanded nonstop circumnavigation of the globe, in 1968.

In 2007, nearly four decades after his last circumnavigation and aged 68, Knox-Johnston once again sailed solo around the world in the VELUX 5 Oceans Race, being the oldest to ever enter the event.

Not all voyages, however, have gone to plan. Desjoyeauxs latest trip in the Transat Jacques Vabre ended up with him dismasting just 140 miles (260 kilometers) from the finish.

Steve White (second from right) with other Brits in the 2008-09 Vendee Globe and Knox-Johnston (second from left). White faced a battle just to fund his entry but finished a creditable eighth.

Sailing on the high seas around the world
Sailing on the high seas around the world
Sailing on the high seas around the world
Sailing on the high seas around the world
Sailing on the high seas around the world
Sailing on the high seas around the world
Sailing on the high seas around the world
Sailing on the high seas around the world
Sailing on the high seas around the world
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The Extreme Sailing Series provides volatile racing action, as the Aberdeen Asset Management crew found when capsizing in Cowes, England.

Sailors are stretched to their limit throughout the events. Here, Realteam bowman Thierry Wasem holds on by his feet as he tries to keep his crew on track.

The series is about close, stadium racing, enabling boats such as Holmatro (pictured) to get tight to rivals and spectators alike.

The margins between triumph and disaster tend to be very fine, as BT Betterworlds crew know all too well.

Among the competitors are a host of well-known teams, including former Americas Cup winner Alinghi.

Perhaps the most high-profile entrant this year is Americas Cup winner Ben Ainslie, who will skipper his own crew when the competition starts in Singapore.

For all his experience, though, Ainslie has been warned about the perils of the series, where crashes and damage to multimillion-dollar catamarans are not uncommon.

Unlike many other top-class sailing events, fans and spectators are able to get up close and personal with the competitors.

The series travels to all manner of venues across the globe after the first act (as each regatta is known) in Singapore starting February 20.

No venue is too small, apparently, with crews even battling it out on the narrow canals of Amsterdam, Holland, in recent years.

The series plays host to a variety of breathtaking backdrops, such as this one in Portugal last season.

The man to beat this year is British skipper Leigh McMillan, who is targeting a hat-trick of series titles with his boat The Wave Muscat.

Sailings Extreme Race Series
Sailings Extreme Race Series
Sailings Extreme Race Series
Sailings Extreme Race Series
Sailings Extreme Race Series
Sailings Extreme Race Series
Sailings Extreme Race Series
Sailings Extreme Race Series
Sailings Extreme Race Series
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Sailing in the extreme

The worlds 20 best yacht racing photographs have been shortlisted for the Mirabaud Yacht Racing Image of 2013, an eclectic mixture of photographs on the high seas.

In total, 82 photographers from 19 different countries entered, including American Jen Edney — who here snaps Michele Sighel as he checks his crew on their passage from Honolulu to the Philippines.

The shots span the globe — in this instance Keel Week Race in Germany, where photographer Ainhoa Sanchez Vidales observed: Feel the control of the sailor to dominate all the elements.

The award is handed out on December 11 at the World Yacht Racing Forum in Gothenberg, Sweden, where all the photographs are on show — including this dramatic drop in the ocean.

Competitor Biljard Guus focuses on the waves ahead during the 2.4-meter fleet racing in the World Paralympic Sailing Championships at Kinsale, Ireland.

Here Stefano Rizzi poses as he waits for the start of the International Moth classs Italian Open Championship at Lake Garda. He went on to win a relatively wind-less event.

This overhead shot off the coast of Saint Tropez captures a crew in action away from the sun-kissed French Riviera beaches, highlighting the elegant nature of the vast yachts in action.

Some pictures highlight the treacherous nature of the seas — not that the yachtsman in question here looks unduly concerned as he appears to dip into the water on-board the sailboat Elena.

Photographer Max Ranchi captures one of the competitors in Mays Trofeo Conde de Godo race near Barcelona, as he explains in his own words, coming out of the weather mark, bearing away and ready to set gennaker.

Here, the vessel Virbac-Paprec MOD70 looks a nanosecond away from capsizing as she masters a course at speed during Junes La Route des Princes race from Spain to France via Ireland and the UK, as taken by Josep Sanchez.

A spectacular offshore picture taken of Spanish boat Desafío Mapfre near Portugal during Februarys bid to break the Atlantic Ocean crossing record along the Route of Discovery traveled by Christopher Columbus in 1492.

The physicality of sailing is summed up with aplomb here during Augusts 420 European Junior Championships in Pwllheli, Wales, with winds of 20 knots.

Its hard to see where exactly the sea ends and the boat begins in Guillaume Granges image taken with a Canon 5D MKIII during the Mini Transat race in Douarnenez, France.

Dheer Singhi, of Chennai, tackles winds of 23 knots during a race at Indias Topper class national championships. He went on to tie with Vishnu Sujeesh but had to settle for silver on a countback.

The notorious Sydney to Hobart race has had its tragedies, but this time it was comfortably won by Wild Oats XI, owned by Bob Oatley, in a new record of one day, 18 hours, 23 minutes and 12 seconds.

Photographer Rick Tomlinson, snapping the all-female crew of Team SCAs ocean racing venture, described it as a photo session with many good shots, it was hard to chose which one to enter into the competition.

A glorious blue sky is almost entirely filled by this monstrous 129-foot yacht, with its hard-working crew toiling on a big wave on an upwind leg during the Les Voiles de Saint Tropez race, which ended October 6.

A boat is immediately in the thick of the action at the Celtic Regatta in Wales Cardigan Bay, where a strong southwesterly wind over the tide caused a large swell. Photographer Andy Green piloted his own boat and took pictures at the same time.

An out-of-focus yellow buoy bobs on the surface of the water as, in a distance, Pachakis Ioannis glides over the water in Octobers Cretan Union Cup, captured on a Pentax 450mm.

British sailor Mark Andrews powers upwind in the Finn class of Mays Delta Lloyd Regatta at Medemblik. Andrews beat Dutch favorite Pieter-Jan Postma following a thrilling medal race.

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The 20 best sailing images of 2013

It was quite close to a back belly flop and, while I wouldnt have killed myself, I certainly would have had some nasty internal injuries.
Diving wise, Id always wanted to dive but wasnt sure until I got to the top whether Id have the guts to do it.
Id been up a 10-meter board at a pool in training but never dived off it. So this was a first and, once I was up there, I sort of thought I might as well go for it.
As he pondered that stomach-churning dive, Thomson says he felt surprisingly calm.
As a sailor Im used to hoisting myself up the mast and you get well versed at reading the wind and the waves so I was quite aware if there was suddenly going to be a change in the boats course, he explains.
There wasnt, he duly hit the water and quickly returned to the surface to the relief and cheers of his team.
Even now, Thomson, who has a penchant for being something of a daredevil, is not entirely sure why he performed the stunt.
I did a keel walk a while ago and we did a video for that, which got over two million people watching which I was flabbergasted by, he admits.
So we got talking about doing something else and this seemed a bit of fun really.
Id taken to running up the mast — although not necessarily to the top — for a while, mostly when entertaining people on the boat to, say, take pictures of them on the deck.
So, going the whole way up and jumping off seemed a good idea.
Its a bit like the Vendee Globe (the race to circumnavigate the globe). You sort of agree to it not thinking it will necessarily happen, and then suddenly the day comes for it.
Having done a keel walk two years ago and now a mast walk, Thomson is at a loss to consider what might complete a hat-trick of sailing stunts.
That was the same after the keel walk. Id never planned to follow that or do something like this, it just happened. So when Im asked what I might do next, I literally have no idea.
Read: The perils of sailing solo around the world
Read: Extreme Sailing Series – F1 on water

These “Mrs Mops” were part of the family they worked for

These “Mrs Mops” were part of the family they worked for and were fully trusted. In all the families mentioned above all the kids also “loved” Mrs Mop. Only one of the families mentioned above had a live in permanent cleaner/helper who was the only one called by her Christian name (Beryl) others were known affectionately as either Mrs P or straight Mrs Breckon. Generally the husbands of the Mrs Mops were artisans that is they would have skills like plumbing or carpentry or painting and decorating. All would have served in the Second World War and both Mrs Mop and her husband would smoke, probably “Woodbines” up to 60 per day.

In the 1930s most of the house owners would have smoked and some but not all of their wives. None of their children would have openly smoked in front of their parents before they were 21. (The 21 key of the door phrase which meant the young offspring of either sex could stay out after midnight went out during the Second World War). Very young offspring would start school at 3 at a kindergarten in a private house. There was one main one which served Keston and Farnborough Park, Miss Figgis’ in Crofton Road. This was 3 miles from the far side of Keston Park and 3 year olds would walk! The two children of the family with this 3 mile walk were accompanied by their grandfather (80 years old) who obviously had to walk 12 miles a day for this task.
London 50 Years Ago

Job, Owner of bespoke clothing manufacturing company. Two children.

Park Avenue
Job, Owner of bespoke clothing manufacturing company. Two children.
Park Avenue
Job, Importer of tea, Office in Bromley, Two children
Meadow Way
Job, Owner of (real) estate agency in Bromley. Two Children
The Glen
Job, Owner of a small company in Farnborough village manufacturing car foot-pumps. Two children.
The Glen
Job, Army Brigadier. Two children
Sunnydale
Job, Accountant and partner in a major city firm of accountants, two children

Hence the majority of the house owners of these estates were self made men running their own businesses within a few miles of their houses or professionals engineers or senior managers, directors or partners working for larger companies in the London area. Some would have served in the First World War and the majority would have had active service in the Second World War. By far the vast majority had two children both sent to private school with many boarding as far away as the Midlands. Of all the house owners listed only one was known to have a divorced partner. All had daily cleaners who would walk or bike to work from either Farnborough Village (or the nearby Crofton Road council estate) or Keston Village as appropriate.

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